Kids Weigh In – Part I

“Kids Weigh In,” is a a series of blog posts by students from around the world who are participating in CritterKin’s Not Perfect Hat Club project.  In the spirit of the Not Perfect Hat Club mission – to give every kid a place to hang a hat – we will be sharing the many and varied ways participants express their understanding of what it means to be perfectly Not Perfect. Want to start your own Not Perfect Hat Club project? Contact: JenaBall@CritterKin.com   Part I – Brent International School in the Philippines So proud of my 5th grade students as they describe what it’s like to be perfectly not perfect. Love the creativity they illustrated in the drawings they created in Google Drawing. They learned that it is okay not to excel in everything. We all have unique qualities to offer and that’s perfectly not perfect. This slideshow requires JavaScript.   NOT PERFECT  by Ana B. Ok so-so ordinary “Someone” (she’s just one of those people who’s never my favorite) problems (not the math ones,the other ones they say) myself imperfect basicly everything basicly everyone the ”Someone” (needs to be mentioned twice) It’s ok to be imperfect (though this ”Someone” is WAY too much) because there IS something you are really tops at. Like one of the people I met is great at chess but not so great at drawing. Everyone is  imperfect anyway. Everything is.  So it’s actually perfect to be imperfect! ———————————————————————————————– Not Perfect by Nasif A. BEFORE THE VIDEO Fails Ok Not the best Normal Not good at sport AFTER THE VIDEO Not the worst or not the best...

Falling Isn’t Failing

  There’s a compelling YouTube video being passed around social media. It’s called “Pick Em Back Up,” and it was produced by Proctor and Gamble as part of their sponsorship of the upcoming winter Olympics. It’s billed as a thank you to mothers for helping pick their children up when they fell and providing the encouragement they needed to try again. Of course the point of the video is to celebrate the mothers of Olympic athletes who not only picked their kids up, but watched them go on to make Olympic history. As beautiful and inspiring as the images of ice skaters finally completing triple axels, skiers flying past flags without crashing, and hockey players slamming pucks into goals were, I’d love to see other kinds of falls (emotional, mental and physical) that did not result in fairy tale endings. I would love, for example, to see a video about the boy on my high school swim team with brittle diabetes. It took enormous courage, careful planning and the watchful eyes of everyone on the team to get him through his workouts. Or how about my college friend whose neck was broken by a drunk driver who ran a red light?  She was paralyzed from the neck down but refused to feel sorry for herself. “The accident sucked,” she used to say, “but what am I supposed to do, give up?” My experiences as an Olympic-swimmer-wanna-be also taught me an invaluable lesson about emotions and perception. After failing to make the trials at the age of 17 I was devastated. I dragged myself out of the water and went...

The Steam Punk Kid!

  Just for fun, I’m making a steam punk top hat and wanted to share it with YOU!  Here are the steps of the hat making.  I’m not done yet so more steps and pictures will come again soon. 1. Get a top hat template online. Choose one with a cool tutorial video like this: Click the image above to see the tutorial 2. Measure your head to get the right hat size 3. Cut out the pattern to be the right size 4. Trace your patterns on a yoga mat (I used a camping mat -worked great but the pattern had to be adjusted due to the thickness) 5. Cut them out with a VERY sharp knife (if you are a kid like me, get your Mom or Dad to help you) 6. Glue the pieces together with contact cement (NOT Rubber Cement) to create the top hat (the pattern will tell you how they fit together) 7. While my camping mat did not require the hairdryer trick in the video to bend the brim, you may need this step if you use another type of foam for the base of the hat 8. Cut craft foam into squares, rectangles, and other shapes and glue to the top hat with contact cement Here is a picture of my project so far….   Painting the Top Hat Today my project transformed. I started to see my SteamPunk Top Hat look like a Top Hat and less like a multi-colored toy. I applied two coats of black paint to the foam and rivets and quickly it started to look like metal pieces that had been riveted to the hat....