You Can Only Be Perfect at Being Yourself by Rylee

NOT PERFECT N: Not Perfect O: Opinions of mine aren’t always right but I don’t care as long as I am having fun T: To be Not Perfect means that I can’t do everything   P: Perfectly NOT perfect E: Even if I get a great score at gymnastics it is still not perfect R: Really great times aren’t even perfect F: Fun times means not being perfect but you still get excited E: Even sometimes I get things wrong C: Cause I’m not perfect makes me happy T: The Not Perfect Hat Club is something to show people you can’t be perfect     In school we started talking about the Not Perfect Hat Club. The Not Perfect Hat Club helps show kids that even though they aren’t perfect, they can still do awesome things. We all have different things that we are good at and different passions. You can only be perfect at being yourself. That’s what makes us perfectly not perfect. My mom asked me what I wanted for Christmas and I said either something that has to do with designing or animals or art, because they are my passions, and mom thought we could find a way to put them all together. That’s how we started making dog clothes for shelter dogs. I wanted to pick shelter and rescue dogs because they don’t have owners or families to take care of them yet. Shelter dogs have to be shaved sometimes because they can be dirty or their fur is ruined and they will need to keep warm. The problem is, neither of us knows how...

Not Perfect Hat Club Celebrated in NY

   Click on image to read article There’s nothing quite so rewarding as seeing the results of your hard work and dreams reflected in the smiles of kids. Today, the very first official Not Perfect Hat Club  launched in Whitehall, New York as Deb Aubin’s 12 “Special Ed” kids proved once again that they are VERY special indeed.  Watch this amazing video that is airing on CBS 6 news in Albany, New York. Then read the inspirational story that appeared in the PostStar, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 2009.    Click on image to read the article Please help us make the Not Perfect Hat Club and related teaching materials available to schools and students around the world by supporting our fundraising campaign. You can learn all about it by watching the video below and visiting our crowdfunding page: https://pubslush.com/project/4118 Click on the image above to play the...

Falling Isn’t Failing

  There’s a compelling YouTube video being passed around social media. It’s called “Pick Em Back Up,” and it was produced by Proctor and Gamble as part of their sponsorship of the upcoming winter Olympics. It’s billed as a thank you to mothers for helping pick their children up when they fell and providing the encouragement they needed to try again. Of course the point of the video is to celebrate the mothers of Olympic athletes who not only picked their kids up, but watched them go on to make Olympic history. As beautiful and inspiring as the images of ice skaters finally completing triple axels, skiers flying past flags without crashing, and hockey players slamming pucks into goals were, I’d love to see other kinds of falls (emotional, mental and physical) that did not result in fairy tale endings. I would love, for example, to see a video about the boy on my high school swim team with brittle diabetes. It took enormous courage, careful planning and the watchful eyes of everyone on the team to get him through his workouts. Or how about my college friend whose neck was broken by a drunk driver who ran a red light?  She was paralyzed from the neck down but refused to feel sorry for herself. “The accident sucked,” she used to say, “but what am I supposed to do, give up?” My experiences as an Olympic-swimmer-wanna-be also taught me an invaluable lesson about emotions and perception. After failing to make the trials at the age of 17 I was devastated. I dragged myself out of the water and went...